Ora, o SENHOR disse a Abrão: Sai-te da tua terra, da tua parentela e da casa de teu pai, para a terra que eu te mostrarei.
E far-te-ei uma grande nação, e abençoar-te-ei e engrandecerei o teu nome; e tu serás uma bênção.
E abençoarei os que te abençoarem, e amaldiçoarei os que te amaldiçoarem; e em ti serão benditas todas as famílias da terra.
Gênesis 12:1-3

PLURI-ETHNIC NATION

BRAZIL, WORK IN PROGRESS

“Only if we understand, can we care. Only if we care, we will help. Only if we help, we shall be saved.” Jane Goodall.

 

Brazil. With over 300 ethnicities, we have many nations in just one country. As anthropologist and primatologist Jane Goodall would say: "“Only if we understand, can we care. Only if we care, we will help. Only if we help, we shall be saved.” As a Brazilian myself, from one of the biggest cities of the planet, São Paulo, I can say that most non-indigenous Brazilians (especially those living at the capitals) have no idea that there are over 300 ethnicities in the country, let alone the reality of each of those. Most non-indigenous Brazilians knows about 5, 10 , maybe 20 ethnicities, and most see these peoples as 'exotic' and 'savages'. 
 

The bureaucracy and bad faith from people in various positions would keep the media away. Therefore, the maiority  don't understand, don't care, don't help.

KAYAPÓ

Living at the states of Mato Grosso and Pará, the Kayapó people don't call themselves this way.  The term Kayapó, also spelled Caiapó or Kaiapó, comes from neighbouring peoples and means "those who look like monkeys". This name is probably based on a Kayapó men's ritual involving monkey masks. They call themselves Mebêngôkre, which means "the men from the water hole." Other names for them include Gorotire, Kuben-Kran-Krên, Mekrãgnoti, Metyktire and Xikrin
 

Their body paintings are complex and vary according to gender, age and situation.

"A white man went to my tribe, came up to me and said: "why do you have a watch?". I said: "Because I want to. What about you?"

The colors they wear represents their tribes colors. Kayapo men adorn themselves with radiating feathers in their hair, as the feathers represent the universe. Kayapo men also can be seen with rope in their hair, to represent the rope in which the first Kayapo used to arrive from the sky. 

 

Traditionally, Kayapo men cover their lower bodies with sheaths. Due to increased contact with outside cultures, contemporary Kayapo can often been seen wearing Western style clothing such as shorts. Kayapo chiefs wear a headdress made out of vibrant yellow feathers to represent the rays of the sun. 

*PHOTO GALLERY UNDER CONSTRUCTION
CAPTIONED PHOTOS TO BE POSTED SOON.
PARAGRAPH INFO SOURCE: WIKIPEDIA

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XINGU PEOPLES

The Upper Xingu region was heavily populated prior to European and African contact. Densely populated settlements developed from 1200 to 1600 CE. Ancient roads and bridges linked communities that were often surrounded by ditches or moats. The villages were pre-planned and featured circular plazas. Archaeologists have unearthed 19 villages so far.

Kuikuro oral history says European slavers arrived in the Xingu region around 1750, with tens of thousands of indigenous being dramatically reduced by diseases such as flu, measles, smallpox and malaria. 

The Brazilian Villas-Bôas brothers visited the area beginning in 1946, and pushed for the creation of the Parque Indígena do Xingu, eventually established in 1961. There are 16 Xingu ethnicities with similar habits and social systems, despite different languages.

*PHOTO GALLERY UNDER CONSTRUCTION
MORE INFO AND CAPTIONED PHOTOS TO BE POSTED SOON.
PARAGRAPH INFO SOURCE: WIKIPEDIA

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Soon: XINGU'S MOST IMPORTANT CELEBRATION: KUARUP

RIKBAKTSA

Rikbaktsa (Rikbaktsa rik, person + bak, human being + tsa [plural suffix]), the group's self-denomination, can be translated as "the human beings". Variant spellings include Ricbacta, Erikbaktsa, Erigpaktsa, Erigpagtsá, Erigpactsa, Erikbaktsá, Arikpaktsá, and Aripaktsá. These people are also called Canoeiros (Canoe People), alluding to their aptitude in canoe use, or—more rarely—Orelhas de Pau (Wooden Ears), alluding to their practice of enlarging their earlobes with wooden plugs.

"Please take a photo of me, I want to show my culture to people outside my tribe"

There are no pre-20th century historical references to the Rikbaktsa, and there have been no archeological studies to date their occupation of their traditional lands. However, oral histories, geographic references in their myths, and their detailed knowledge of nearby flora and fauna suggest that they have lived on the land for a long some time.

*PHOTO GALLERY UNDER CONSTRUCTION

MORE CAPTIONED PHOTOS TO BE POSTED SOON

PARAGRAPH SOURCE:WIKIVISUALLY  

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XAVANTE

By the end of the 18th century, Xavante's ancestors crossed the Araguaia river and separated from the Xerente, which remained at the other side of the river.  Xavante elders tell some stories about the separation. One of the versions says that a dolphin stood up in the middle of the river, making it uncrossable, so the ones who were still at the other side were too scared to go ahead. Another version says that many dolphins took the Xavantes to the other side of the river. In both versions, the ones that remained east were abandoned forever and are the ancestors of the Xerente ethnicity.

A 2015 genetic study reached a surprising conclusion about the origins of the Xavante people. Unlike other Native American peoples, the Paiter-Surui, Karitiana, and Xavante have an ancestry partially related to indigenous Australasian populations of the Andaman Islands, New Guinea, and Australia. 

*PHOTO GALLERY UNDER CONSTRUCTION

MORE CAPTIONED PHOTOS TO BE POSTED SOON

PARAGRAPH SOURCE: ISA AND WIKIPEDIA

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GUARANI

 The Guarani were one of the first peoples to be contacted by European , when they arrived in South America more than 500 years ago. Nowadays they are more than 50k in Brazil, making them the most numerous ethnicity. They're also present in Paraguay, the Misiones Province of Argentina,and parts of Uruguay and Bolivia.

*PHOTO GALLERY UNDER CONSTRUCTION
CAPTIONED PHOTOS TO BE POSTED SOON.
PARAGRAPH INFO SOURCE: SURVIVAL

 

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KRAHÔ

The Krahô call themselves Mehim, a term that, in the past, was probably extended to members of other groups who spoke the same language and followed the same cultural practices. Nowadays, this array of groups is known as the Timbira, while Mehim is applied to the members of any indigenous group. The expansion of these terms of reference has been correlated with a contraction in the meaning of the opposite term, Cupe(n), which used to refer to all non-Timbira but is now applied only to non-Indians.

 

*PHOTO GALLERY UNDER CONSTRUCTION

MORE CAPTIONED PHOTOS TO BE POSTED SOON

PARAGRAPH INFO SOURCE:ISA

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KARIRI-XOCÓ

The Xocó of Brazil, numbering 425, are Unengaged and Unreached. They are part of the South American Indigenous people cluster within the Latin-Caribbean Americans affinity bloc. This people group is only found in Brazil. Their primary language is Portuguese. The primary religion practiced by the Xocó is ethnic religion. Ethnic religion is deeply rooted in a people's ethnic identity and conversion essentially equates to cultural assimilation.

*PHOTO GALLERY UNDER CONSTRUCTION

MORE CAPTIONED PHOTOS TO BE POSTED SOON

PARAGRAPH INFO SOURCE:ISA

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FULNI-Ô

The Fulni-ô is the only indigenous group of Northeastern Brazil that was able to keep its language – the Ia-tê – alive and active. Mostly adults and the aged use Ia-tê; children and young people use Portuguese more frequently. Even though Ia-tê may be losing ground to Portuguese, it still plays an important role in the Fulni-ô society.

*PHOTO GALLERY UNDER CONSTRUCTION

MORE CAPTIONED PHOTOS TO BE POSTED SOON

PARAGRAPH INFO SOURCE:ISA

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Copyright © 2019 Antropologia Visual.

REPRODUCTION IS STRICTLY PROHIBITED WITHOUT PERMISSION, according to U.S federal Copyright Act of 1976.

REPRODUÇÃO EXPRESSAMENTE PROIBIDA SEM AUTORIZAÇÃO, de acordo com a Lei Federal do Brasil nº 9.610, de 19 de fevereiro de 1998
- In God I trust -